Brazil – Angra dos Reis

Angra dos Reis – translated from Portuguese means ‘Creek of the Kings’. This state of Brazil was first discovered back in the early 1500’s by the Portuguese naval fleet. An archipelago of 365 islands, one for every day of the year, Angra is a favorite vacation spot for many in the region and even for the whole country. We came about it through Brazilian friends who have a place on the ‘Big Island’ (Ilha Grande).

Angra dos Reis – on the coast of Brazil between Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

A handful of the 365 islands of Angra dos Reis, Brazil.

Angra is a fairly remote area. From Sao Paulo, there is one windy road along the coast and another through the tropical hilly terrain, both of which take a good six plus hours to go the 240 miles. From Rio de Janeiro, there is one windy road, mostly along the coast, that takes three plus hours to go 90 miles. The best way to arrive is by plane, and as luck would have it our friends just happened to have their own plane – go figure! 🙂 My first small plane ride ever and I have to experience landing on a landing strip that starts at the tip of an ocean inlet and end at the base of a mountain, in the rain! Thank goodness I didn’t have a heart attack then and there or I would’ve missed the most magical next 3 days of my life.

Coming in for a landing to the landing strip at Angra dos Reis regional airport.

Besides tourism, the area is noted for fishing, agricultural products (bananas, coconuts, oranges, hearts of palm and sugar cane), steel export and transporting oil. Many residents on the island are in the service industry – the culture in Brazil in general is very service oriented. Our friends have paid staff in the house to look after any and all needs of the family: cook, nanny, clean, garden. They have a separate crew to man their 78-foot yacht. Our friends are humble and full of gratitude to their staff and the staff is like family – it is viewed as an employer/employee not a hierarchy.

The crew on our friends boat coming into the marina to pick us up from a day at one of the many islands of Angra dos Reis.

The attitude and attire are laid back in this very temperate climate where the high temps throughout the year range from 77 to 87, and the lows range from 62 to 77. Because they are on the beach or on the boat almost every day, our friends tend to live in swimsuits and flip-flops. The rainy season is from December through March (their summer) where they average 10 inches of rain a month. One of the nights we were there – I think they might have received their rain total for the month. It rained, and rained, and rained! I love a good rainstorm as much as a crystal clear day or a starry night!

View from the beach home we found ourselves lucky enough to be staying at while in Angra dos Reis.

A dark and eerie sky ready to open up and unload several inches of rain.

Upon arriving at our friend’s home, we were told to don our bathing suits – we were heading right out on the boat to go and check out one of their favorite islands known as ‘Dentist Island’ – apparently a century or so ago it was owned by a very prominent dentist in the area.  To me it was what beach dreams are made of – a deserted looking island right out of a movie scene. The boat was anchored offshore about 50 yards and we swam to the shore for a run up and down the beach and then swam back to the boat for our first caipirinha of the day, and a feast of fresh fruit, veggies and fish dishes.

A ‘life is good’ moment in Angra does Reis.

My husband and daughter both tried stand-up paddle boarding – one fared a bit better than the other, but I won’t say who, other than ‘nicely done sweetie!’ 🙂 Our hostess has it down so well she paddle boards all over the bay with her dog Louie sitting serenely at her feet. After another caipirhina or two, it was back to our friends amazing beach house. Our hostess designed it and utilized boulders from the area to create unique room settings.

My daughter getting the hand of stand-up paddle boarding in the quiet bay of Dentist Island.

Louie waiting to go paddle-boarding!

The next morning arrived bright with sunshine. After a breakfast of a tapioca crepes filled with eggs and ham, and more of the islands fresh fruit, it was off to hit the links for the older adults. A fun little course that winds it way through the foothills within a driver distance of the beach house. We saw a giant hamster, aka Capybaras, many of us saw on the Olympic coverage from Rio. Golfing in these tropical regions sure is humid and sweaty, but you do stay loose! Luckily we were brought cold beers and more fresh fruit at the turn to keep our hydration levels up.

Getting up close and personal on the golf course with a local capybara.

Not too many golf courses you have to hit over ancient ruins to get to the green.

After a quick freshen up back at the beach house it was off the magical island of Paraty – a town built back in the early 1800’s reminiscent of a European colorful hamlet. Buildings of white, trimmed with a multitude of different colors, veined with concave cobblestone streets so rain drains towards the ocean. The town is filled with boutique shops, bookstores, coffee shops, restaurants and ice cream shops. We bought some artifacts from Amazonian tribes at one of the stores. We had an ice cream cone for lunch, because our host asked us not to eat too much as he was having fresh lobster flown in and was cooking for us tonight – which meant he oversaw his cook grilling the lobster! 🙂 Twenty plus lobster tails for 5 of us – you do the math! Teamed with another caipirinha or two, and a couple of shared bottles of wine meant a deep sleep for all.

The colorful tourist boats in the Paraty Harbor, reading to take guests out on the water for a Paraty style party!

The colorfully trimmed white buildings of Paraty, with concave cobblestone streets.

Needless to say we slept in the next morning. But before our final boat trip back to the plane to take us to our next destination – Rio de Janeiro, we all took a nice long bike ride. The guys went one way and the gals took another way, back through the golf course where we just missed riding over a coral snake, along a beach to see a new Fasano resort in development, and past a few more of the docile capybaras.

My daughter and I on one last trek, on bikes, through the beauty that is Angra dos Reis.

A couple more Capybaras lounging by the river on the golf course we biked through.

My daughter and our extremely gracious hostess for our time spent at Angra dos Reis.

All in all a this was a trip unlike anything any of us had ever experienced – mainly because of the hospitality of our friends, but it is certainly a destination worth checking out for anybody. Albeit it a challenge to get there, everything is in place to create an unforgettable experience for any new comer to the area. Since we only experienced 3 of the 365 islands we will definitely be putting Angra dos Reis on our ‘return to’ travel list.

Stay tuned for Brazil Part 3: Rio de Janeiro and the Global Gallery from all three stops in Brazil.

 

 

 

 

Brazil – Sao Paulo

Brazil. Where does one start? The food. The people. The culture. The beauty – natural and manmade. Brazil was never on my bucket list, not even an honorable mention. When my husband began traveling there for business my interest became piqued to see a destination not on many people’s bucket list. That interest was further inspired by the recent 2016 Summer Olympic Games. (FYI: a VISA is needed for Americans to travel to Brazil.)

Brazil, South America.

Every year my daughter and I, whether together or not, travel to a unique location somewhere in this amazing world of ours. The opportunity to travel to Brazil with my husband on one of his business trips was too great an opportunity for us to pass up. He had already been to Brazil multiple times, knew the lay of the land and how to navigate a region not regarded as overly safe. The locals we know cautiously reminded us to be extra vigilant and monitored our travel itineraries to be sure we weren’t going into areas they would not recommend. But like any place else, be smart and be aware and you’ll be safe.

And I am happy to report we had a very safe trip – we did not have one instance of concern. No clutching our purses to our chest or looking over our shoulders. Which would’ve been a travesty as there was something to behold in every direction. I have now added Brazil to my bucket list because there is so much more to see and do – we did not even scratch the surface in the 10 days we were there. We were however, able to experience some areas probably better known to locals than to tourists in the regions we visited, thanks to the local connections we have.

Because our experiences were as vast at the country itself I will break the Brazil post up into three parts: 1) Sao Paulo; 2) Angra dos Reis; 3) Rio de Janeiro. The proximity of South America to North America actually makes it fairly easy, but long trip to Brazil – about a 9 hour flight from the US mainland. Most flights out of the US depart from Atlanta (Delta) or Dallas (American) and fly directly to Sao Paulo. We flew out of NYC – which is another direct flight option. All flights to Brazil are red-eyes, mainly into Sao Paulo, so the flight goes fast since you sleep through the bulk of it, waking in time for a quick breakfast before touch down on the runway. The time zone change is minimal compared to travel abroad to the east or west. Example – from Rio de Janeiro to the west coast of the U.S. is 4-5 hours depending on time of year.

Sao Paulo, Angra dos Reis, and Rio de Janeiro – along the southeast border of Brazil.

Part 1: Sao Paulo

The geographical spread of Sao Paulo  is so expansive I couldn’t fit the whole city into my pictures taken from the plane. It is an urban setting of 24 million people spread out over an area of 85 miles from edge to edge. Sao Paulo is the international business and cultural center of Brazil. People in Brazil tend to work in Sao Paulo and play in Rio. Portuguese is the language spoken in Brazil, but like most places in the world we had no problem getting around not being fluent in Portuguese – although we certainly picked up a lot of Portuguese phrases throughout our stay, and locals appreciated our efforts to reply back to them in Portuguese. And according to a friend who speaks Portuguese, the Portuguese spoken in Brazil has a more fluid lilt to it then what is spoken in Portugal, and is a little easer to pick up.

The city of Sao Paulo spreads out, and out, and out….

We stayed at the Fasano Hotel, a high-end boutique-style hotel chain. Once settled into our rooms, it didn’t take us long to indulge in the first cultural experience of Brazil – a drink called the ‘Caipirinha‘. Muddled limes with a touch of sugar and a generous pour-over of a Brazilian rum called cachaca, shaken and served in glass full of crushed ice. The locals drink this as much as the tourists – but beware, one is just right, two will land you on your arse. Even the locals don’t push it and if they are going to drink multiple Caipirinhas they will use vodka instead of the local rum. This local rum is made from raw pure cane sugar where other rums are generally made from processed sugar.

A Caipirinha – a Brazilian drink even the locals drink. Refreshing and very potent!

Food is also a forte of Sao Paulo – one restaurant has ranked as high as 9th in the world: Dom. We were lucky enough to get in by booking our reservations well in advance. The focus at Dom is on using Brazilian grown ingredients in Brazilian created dishes. A prix fixe gastronomical dining experience worth every high calorie laden bite. And if you like your beer cold – Brazil is the place for you. They house their beers in an extra cold fridge, serve it in mini pilsner glasses so you drink it before it gets warm, and keep the unfinished bottle in a table side ice bucket.

Beer served in miniature glasses to the beer in it doesn’t have a chance to get warm.

Keeping the beer ice-cold in an ice bucket table side.

After a long deep sleep to recover from Day 1 travel and heavy eats, it was time to stretch our legs and see some of the culture of Sao Paulo. Off to Ibirapuera Park, their version of Central Park, where we walked on heavily treed paths along waterways, while quenching our thirst with fresh coconut water. Coconut stands dot the pathways – the vendor cuts a hole in the coconut, adds fresh cold water that mixes with the coconut juice and you sip it with a long straw. As the heat of the day increased we took our interests inside to the Sao Paulo Museum of Art which houses pieces of work from locals on the first floor, to pieces from the world’s most well renowned artists of all time on the second floor. The Museum sits up off the ground – during the week this covered space serves as a shelter for the homeless. And twice a week they clear this space out and it becomes a flea market.

Beautiful heavily tree-lined pathways of Sao Paulo’s version of Central Park.

Multiple vendors sell fresh coconuts along what waterways in Iberpuera Park.

An installation of artists from Renoir to Picasso and classic artists in between, at the Sao Paulo Museum of Art. Each painting is placed on an individual stand to create an illusion of the artwork floating.

After cooling down we walked down to Sao Paulo’s version of Rodeo Drive for some much-needed shopping on Jardins’ Rua Oscar Freire. My daughter and I simply couldn’t leave Sao Paulo without purchasing some Brazilian styled vibrant clothing. After all that bopping around and shopping around it was time for another refreshment – no better option than our new favorite drink, a Caipirinha, at a cute local eatery right around the corner from out hotel.

After a short nap it was off to one of the most interesting restaurant settings I have ever experienced, at the Figueira Rubaiyat. The open air entrance is guarded by a ficus tree with a trunk diameter of over ten feet and branches jutting out under and through panels in the all clear glass ceiling. That evening we were treated to the most amazing rainstorm I have ever experienced. The area of Sao Paulo we were staying in is built on a very steep hill – our hotel and the restaurant were near the base of this hill. The rain came down so fast and furious there was a raging river racing down the street knee-deep – we couldn’t even make it back to our hotel a half block away. So we indulged in local fresh seafood and wine and waited the storm out.

Apparently this Ficus tree loves the tropical weather of Sao Paulo.

A tropical rainstorm hits Sao Paulo leaving us hostages in the Rubaiyat Restaurant.

Sao Paulo may not be the area to spend the bulk of your time in when visiting Brazil, but it does have enough to sufficiently fill a couple of days. Next it was off to another area the locals love to get away to called Angra dos Reis, an archepegio of 365 islands situated between Sao Paulo and Rio De Janeiro.

Enjoy two more Brazilian posts and check the Global Gallery for more pics of all our stops in Brazil!