Ireland for sightseers and music lovers

Ireland is for golfers. But what has changed dramatically in recent years, is its appeal to anybody and everybody. The tour company we used for our ‘golf’ trip to Ireland, by the name of ‘Links Golf-Ireland‘, informed us that 10-15 years ago their tours consisted of about 80-20 percent in favor of golf tours, but in recent years that percentage has totally flip-flopped. The word is out – Ireland has a host of noteworthy places to visit. From a multitude of sea-ports, to the jaw-dropping rugged shorelines, to the lush ’emerald’ green countryside full of shamrocks, leprechauns, and fairy trees.

Shamrocks everywhere in Ireland, even painted on the back of our travel mate’s head!

Wonder what kind of mischief this leprechaun is up to. If we grab him he has to grant us 3 wishes for his freedom!

One of many fairy trees that dot the Irish countryside – reminding us of the importance of Irish folklore.

As mentioned in the previous post, the culture of Ireland is worth a visit to experience. The locals either stay local, or after a stint to check out what the rest of the world is all about, tend to return to their original roots. If you need to learn how to relax and enjoy what just being alive really means, spend some time in Ireland for a front row seat to what the Irish have perfected. I believe I also mildly touched on the importance of ‘music’ to the Irish culture in my previous post. One of the true highlights of our 10-day excursion was listening to our tour guide/shuttle driver, Eamon Hegarty, regale us with Irish tunes in his melodic Irish lilt and soothing voice. We couldn’t get enough and rarely did he repeat himself with the same song – and one song, Seven Drunken Nights, went through the whole week as each stanza started with the day of the week.

It was of great importance that we didn’t tucker ourselves out during the day, so we always had enough left in the tank to make it to a local pub, or three, each night to listen to live Irish music. Music that takes you in, and quite often takes you from a place of grief to a place of joy and happiness by the end of the song. Or take you on a journey of self-deprecating humor that has a place for everyone to connect. I can only imagine many of these songs being born on the bar stools of many a pub, plenty of Guinness to loosen the tongue and lips.

The entrance to the Guinness Brewery – looks like you’re entering Fort Knox.

Look at all those vats of Guinness – they must have known the beer drinking North Americans were coming!

Little known fact – Guinness owns the right to the harp logo. If any other entity, including the state of Ireland wants to use the harp logo they have to use the mirror image of it.

Luckily several of our party had been to Ireland several times, so we wasted no time winging it through our trip.  On our way to have our first pint of Guinness at Gogarty’s Pub and before we took in some great live Irish music off the back entrance off another great pub, Stag’s Head, we took in some of the local history: The General Post OfficeThe Ha’penny Bridge; Illen Bagpipes; Phoenix Park.

The General Post Office, where an uprising was held in 1916 for Irish Independence from the British Empire.

The Ha’penny bridge over the River Liffey.

A random gathering of an Irish musical group outside the back entrance to Stag’s Head Pub in Dublin.

The next morning had us up bright and early and off to Old Head Golf Links – in the rain and thick fog. Afterwards we headed to the idyllic little port town of Kinsale. After checking into Perryville House, and a long hot shower to thaw out from the chilly day on the course, we snuggled up in our jeans and sweaters and walked down to Finns’ Table to enjoy a relaxing 5-star dining experience. Followed by another walk, and a pop into a pub for a little music and what would become a regularity of having a Red Breast Irish Whiskey or some other Irish scotch whiskey for a proper wind down to our long day.

Perryville House, Kinsale. A quaint Inn off the bay in Kinsale – large comfy rooms and a great bar lounge area.

The harbour in Kinsale – a beautiful backdrop to a quaint little town where you can enjoy 5-star dining in your jeans.

The following day after our round at Tralee Golf Club we worked our way towards the more inland base of Killarney – where we spent two nights at the Ross Hotel. One great thing about all the Irish towns – they are all very walkable. After a dinner of Irish Stew and a very intense tutorial on the proper pouring and drinking of Guinness by our gracious host Eamon Hegarty, we set off to do a little late night shopping of soft and cozy Irish wool sweaters and accessories, and jewelry before tracking down more live Irish music and Irish whiskey.

Ross Hotel, Killarney – great location in the town center, next to a beautiful church, walking distance to castles, pubs, shopping…

How to properly pour a Guinness: Step 1 – pour the glass 1/3 full – let sitl; pour second 1/3 – let sit; pour final 1/3 – let sit. Takes about 20 mins.

Amazingly the glass is still cold. Now ‘stroke’ glass to help beer separate from head. If dranken properly the size of the head should remain the same until the beer is gone.

After a day of golf at Waterville Golf Links, the gals took the next day to explore around Killarney, a couple of us hiking up to one of the many castles that dot the Irish countryside, Ross Castle ruins, circa 15th century. Followed by a visit to Inch Beach – a long stretch of beach that is slowly connecting the arms of the Iveragh (Waterville) Peninsula and the Dingle Peninsula, our next destination.

Ross Castle – a 15th century ruin that sits on the edge of Killarney, a 30-minute easy walk from the town center.

Inch Strand – an idyllic stretch of beach. Great for strolling, searching for seashells, and surfing – if you are so inclined.

Dingle. What a great name for a town. It had a vibe and a style that put a perennial smile on our faces. Colorful buildings filled with local artisans working away at their art, from jewelry to leather goods to knitting. We were also treated to a tour of Dingle Crystal, where we met the owner and head craftsman, Sean Daly, and watched him create one of his original cut-glass styles on Waterford Crystal he brings in uncut. One of Sean’s original cut-glass designs is called the ‘beehive’ named after the beehive huts that exist on Slea Head, Dingle Peninsula, where a big part of the recent Star Wars movie was filmed. We had dinner at Sean’s son’s restaurant, called Solas, named after one of Sean’s styles of cut-glass.

Colorful buildings align the streets of dingle, housing multiple artisans and pubs.

The gals huddle around Sean Daly in his workspace where he spins his magic cut-glass freehand designs.

Then the real highlight of the trip was waiting for us at John Benny’s Pub, where the owner’s wife, Eilis Kennedy, one of the world renown Celtic Divas, and of the duo, Lumiere, gave a somewhat impromptu mini-concert with several of her Irish musical friends. We were mesmerized by their vocal talent and instrumental savvy, with several drop-in’s adding to the musical mix.

Eilis Kennedy and her colleagues regale us with their Irish folklore music – both vocal and instrumental.

The next day took us to our most favorite lodging of the whole trip, Moy House. I could just post pictures and need not write another word – but this a ‘writers blog’ so write I shall. At least a caption or two. Moy House is a 200-year-old home that stood in disrepair for most of its life until a family member lovingly and meticulously renovated it about 20-years ago into a magnificent country house with each room as unique as the lay of the land, and a chef that creates a 5-star dining experience for every meal, with produce and proteins grown on site.

Moy House – a country home turned into lodging of 12 rooms, a full stocked self-serve bar, 5-star restaurant, and 50-acres of walkable grounds.

The rear views of Moy House – overlooking Lahinch Bay.

Stone walls fill the Irish countryside. People could only carry the rocks so far and just piled them up in a line that became property lines.

Lahinch Beach parallels the western holes of Lahinch Golf Club. It is a long expansive beach that allows for some pretty big waves to be created and is well known for its surfing. That’s a little out of our comfort zone being from the AZ desert, so we watched the youngins’ give it a go and stuck to strolling the wide swath of sand with the tide being out giving us ample room to spread out and each find our own private beach experience.

Lahinch Beach – lined with massive boulders to protect the town from high tide.

The bright buildings in the town of Lahinch sit as a colorful backdrop to Lahinch Beach – one of the most popular surfing beaches around.

Enroute to our next destination of Galway, we stopped at the ‘must see’ destination of the Cliffs of Moher. Stunning sea cliffs that go on for about 14 kilometers and range from 390 feet at the low-end up to the biggest drop-off at 702 feet – with no railings along any part of the ridge, so visitor be ware!

One of the highest points at the Cliffs of Moher, just outside of Dingle. A sight to be seen!

The pathways run along the edge of the Cliffs of Moher for 14 km, no railings in sight.

We arrived into Galway on a misty day, but ventured out on a beautiful walk along the waterways outlining this quaint city, dotted with a 14th century Gothic Church, a majestic Cathedral, and more history than all of the US combined. We sauntered around the city streets and low and behold found an interesting little pub to imbibe in our nightly Guinness consumption – at the 800-year-old historic King’s Head Pub. But the music wasn’t your regular Irish fodder so we went to the streets and were greeted with an ensemble of young musicians who randomly gathered and gave the people a musical treat streaming from a multitude of traditional Irish instruments.

Galway, sandwiched between two waterways is a great walking city with beauty along every shoreline.

Galway Cathedral stands tall within the town of Galway.

But the interior was the real sight to behold!

We finished our trip with a three-day stay back where we started, at the Brooks Hotel in Dublin. Now that we were comfortable with our surroundings we spread out and took in as much of the city as we could in what little time we had – more pubs, more shopping, more golf. Our second to last day in Ireland provided a few of us with a highlight of one of the most visually satisfying hikes I have ever experienced. The Howth Coastal Walk – about 10 miles north of Dublin, was a moderately challenging hike along the water’s edge, up and down steep embankments, with views of the ocean, a lighthouse, and immersed in a plethora of colorful unique flora and unique rock outcroppings.

Some of the views from our Coastal Walk on Howth Head were absolutely stunning.

The original Baily Lighthouse off of Howth Head was built in 1667, and is now a fully automated but still working lighthouse.

Some of the colorful flora that dotted the Coastal Walk on Howth.

As busy and full our 10 days in Ireland was – exhaustion never fully set in because the full experience was too exhilarating and left us saying good-bye to Ireland with very big smiles on our faces and a definitive intent to return to the Emerald Isle. But I won’t wait 40 years again for that to happen.

Stay tuned for more great pictures from Ireland in the Global Gallery.

 

4 thoughts on “Ireland for sightseers and music lovers

    • Awe thanks Lena!! I could feel those Irish eyes smiling down – was it the Guinness I was drinking while writing the post! 😛

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