Brazil – Sao Paulo

Brazil. Where does one start? The food. The people. The culture. The beauty – natural and manmade. Brazil was never on my bucket list, not even an honorable mention. When my husband began traveling there for business my interest became piqued to see a destination not on many people’s bucket list. That interest was further inspired by the recent 2016 Summer Olympic Games. (FYI: a VISA is needed for Americans to travel to Brazil.)

Brazil, South America.

Every year my daughter and I, whether together or not, travel to a unique location somewhere in this amazing world of ours. The opportunity to travel to Brazil with my husband on one of his business trips was too great an opportunity for us to pass up. He had already been to Brazil multiple times, knew the lay of the land and how to navigate a region not regarded as overly safe. The locals we know cautiously reminded us to be extra vigilant and monitored our travel itineraries to be sure we weren’t going into areas they would not recommend. But like any place else, be smart and be aware and you’ll be safe.

And I am happy to report we had a very safe trip – we did not have one instance of concern. No clutching our purses to our chest or looking over our shoulders. Which would’ve been a travesty as there was something to behold in every direction. I have now added Brazil to my bucket list because there is so much more to see and do – we did not even scratch the surface in the 10 days we were there. We were however, able to experience some areas probably better known to locals than to tourists in the regions we visited, thanks to the local connections we have.

Because our experiences were as vast at the country itself I will break the Brazil post up into three parts: 1) Sao Paulo; 2) Angra dos Reis; 3) Rio de Janeiro. The proximity of South America to North America actually makes it fairly easy, but long trip to Brazil – about a 9 hour flight from the US mainland. Most flights out of the US depart from Atlanta (Delta) or Dallas (American) and fly directly to Sao Paulo. We flew out of NYC – which is another direct flight option. All flights to Brazil are red-eyes, mainly into Sao Paulo, so the flight goes fast since you sleep through the bulk of it, waking in time for a quick breakfast before touch down on the runway. The time zone change is minimal compared to travel abroad to the east or west. Example – from Rio de Janeiro to the west coast of the U.S. is 4-5 hours depending on time of year.

Sao Paulo, Angra dos Reis, and Rio de Janeiro – along the southeast border of Brazil.

Part 1: Sao Paulo

The geographical spread of Sao Paulo  is so expansive I couldn’t fit the whole city into my pictures taken from the plane. It is an urban setting of 24 million people spread out over an area of 85 miles from edge to edge. Sao Paulo is the international business and cultural center of Brazil. People in Brazil tend to work in Sao Paulo and play in Rio. Portuguese is the language spoken in Brazil, but like most places in the world we had no problem getting around not being fluent in Portuguese – although we certainly picked up a lot of Portuguese phrases throughout our stay, and locals appreciated our efforts to reply back to them in Portuguese. And according to a friend who speaks Portuguese, the Portuguese spoken in Brazil has a more fluid lilt to it then what is spoken in Portugal, and is a little easer to pick up.

The city of Sao Paulo spreads out, and out, and out….

We stayed at the Fasano Hotel, a high-end boutique-style hotel chain. Once settled into our rooms, it didn’t take us long to indulge in the first cultural experience of Brazil – a drink called the ‘Caipirinha‘. Muddled limes with a touch of sugar and a generous pour-over of a Brazilian rum called cachaca, shaken and served in glass full of crushed ice. The locals drink this as much as the tourists – but beware, one is just right, two will land you on your arse. Even the locals don’t push it and if they are going to drink multiple Caipirinhas they will use vodka instead of the local rum. This local rum is made from raw pure cane sugar where other rums are generally made from processed sugar.

A Caipirinha – a Brazilian drink even the locals drink. Refreshing and very potent!

Food is also a forte of Sao Paulo – one restaurant has ranked as high as 9th in the world: Dom. We were lucky enough to get in by booking our reservations well in advance. The focus at Dom is on using Brazilian grown ingredients in Brazilian created dishes. A prix fixe gastronomical dining experience worth every high calorie laden bite. And if you like your beer cold – Brazil is the place for you. They house their beers in an extra cold fridge, serve it in mini pilsner glasses so you drink it before it gets warm, and keep the unfinished bottle in a table side ice bucket.

Beer served in miniature glasses to the beer in it doesn’t have a chance to get warm.

Keeping the beer ice-cold in an ice bucket table side.

After a long deep sleep to recover from Day 1 travel and heavy eats, it was time to stretch our legs and see some of the culture of Sao Paulo. Off to Ibirapuera Park, their version of Central Park, where we walked on heavily treed paths along waterways, while quenching our thirst with fresh coconut water. Coconut stands dot the pathways – the vendor cuts a hole in the coconut, adds fresh cold water that mixes with the coconut juice and you sip it with a long straw. As the heat of the day increased we took our interests inside to the Sao Paulo Museum of Art which houses pieces of work from locals on the first floor, to pieces from the world’s most well renowned artists of all time on the second floor. The Museum sits up off the ground – during the week this covered space serves as a shelter for the homeless. And twice a week they clear this space out and it becomes a flea market.

Beautiful heavily tree-lined pathways of Sao Paulo’s version of Central Park.

Multiple vendors sell fresh coconuts along what waterways in Iberpuera Park.

An installation of artists from Renoir to Picasso and classic artists in between, at the Sao Paulo Museum of Art. Each painting is placed on an individual stand to create an illusion of the artwork floating.

After cooling down we walked down to Sao Paulo’s version of Rodeo Drive for some much-needed shopping on Jardins’ Rua Oscar Freire. My daughter and I simply couldn’t leave Sao Paulo without purchasing some Brazilian styled vibrant clothing. After all that bopping around and shopping around it was time for another refreshment – no better option than our new favorite drink, a Caipirinha, at a cute local eatery right around the corner from out hotel.

After a short nap it was off to one of the most interesting restaurant settings I have ever experienced, at the Figueira Rubaiyat. The open air entrance is guarded by a ficus tree with a trunk diameter of over ten feet and branches jutting out under and through panels in the all clear glass ceiling. That evening we were treated to the most amazing rainstorm I have ever experienced. The area of Sao Paulo we were staying in is built on a very steep hill – our hotel and the restaurant were near the base of this hill. The rain came down so fast and furious there was a raging river racing down the street knee-deep – we couldn’t even make it back to our hotel a half block away. So we indulged in local fresh seafood and wine and waited the storm out.

Apparently this Ficus tree loves the tropical weather of Sao Paulo.

A tropical rainstorm hits Sao Paulo leaving us hostages in the Rubaiyat Restaurant.

Sao Paulo may not be the area to spend the bulk of your time in when visiting Brazil, but it does have enough to sufficiently fill a couple of days. Next it was off to another area the locals love to get away to called Angra dos Reis, an archepegio of 365 islands situated between Sao Paulo and Rio De Janeiro.

Check back soon for the next two Brazilian posts and an upcoming Global Gallery for all of our stops in Brazil!

One thought on “Brazil – Sao Paulo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.