Brooklyn Bound

Brooklyn (71 sm) may live in the shadow of it’s smaller but better known sibling Manhattan (23 sm) in terms of being a destination location, but Brooklyn can certainly hold its own in being well worth the effort to cross the bridges over or take the subway under the East River. It’s about a 15 minute ride either way. If you are feeling energetic, the best way to cross back and forth between the boroughs is to walk over the Brooklyn Bridge.

Walking from Brooklyn to Manhattan across the bridge offers up some of the best views of the Manhattan skyline. With the new 1776′ One World Trade Center looming off to the left views along the bridge on the southeastern tip of Manhattan. To be able to view those two iconic landmarks in one sighting is an amazing site to behold. With this week being the 13th anniversary of the 911 attacks, One World Trade Center is a beautiful reminder to the strength and character of the NYC people and the throngs of well-wishers that come to the site on a daily basis to pay their respects and honor the fallen.

One World Trade Center looms off to the left of the Brooklyn Bridge, in the southern tip of Manhattn

One World Trade Center looms off to the left of the Brooklyn Bridge, in the southern tip of Manhattan

The Brooklyn Bridge is a historical reminder of the foresight and engineering abilities of a generation long ago. Construction began in 1870 and was completed in 1883. To think that the designers, Jason and his son Washington Roebling, built a bridge for an era of horse and buggies, but built the bridge six times stronger than code required and so has stood the test of time as vehicles became heavier and a lot more of them. In the days that followed Hurricane Sandy, the Brooklyn Bridge pedestrian and bicycle walkway became a main artery to get back and forth between Brooklyn and Manhattan.

Old glory waves in the in the window of the west tower of the Brooklyn Bridge - days after two German's exchange the flags for bleached out American Flags - apparently to honor the 130th anniversary of the German designer of the bridge - Joseph Roebling

Old glory waves in the in the window of the west tower of the Brooklyn Bridge – days after two German’s exchange the flags for bleached out American Flags – apparently to honor the 130th anniversary of the German designer of the bridge – Joseph Roebling

The Brooklyn Bridge gives you fairly direct and easy access to great Brooklyn neighborhoods such as Dumbo, Brooklyn Heights, Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, Clinton Hill, Fort Greene and many more. Walking through these neighborhoods gives you a good feel of the diversity of inhabitants of Brooklyn – from the more family oriented Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens to the heavily sought after quaint neighborhoods of Park Slope, Prospect Heights and Crown Heights that still boast larger units for less money when compared to equal sized units in Manhattan.

The promenade or walkway leading from the Brooklyn neighborhood of Cobble Hill to the Brooklyn Bridge and on into Manhattan

The promenade or walkway leading from the Brooklyn neighborhood of Cobble Hill to the Brooklyn Bridge and on into Manhattan

Williamsburg Bridge, which takes you in and out of one of the more well-known neighborhoods in Brooklyn – Williamsburg – was completed in 1903 and with a bike path that is the most heavily biked bridge span in all of North America. Williamsburg itself continues to attract an eclectic crowd of tenants. Either those who tend to be more artistically minded and feel the slower pace of Brooklyn allows for a good atmosphere to let the creative juices flow; or for those who work in Manhattan to come home for a respite from that fast pace that usually accompanies daily life in the streets of Manhattan.

Enjoying an $8 glass of wine in the relaxing setting of Wine Bar in Brooklyn, where the owner talks to you like an old friend

Enjoying an $8 glass of wine in the relaxing setting of Wine Bar in Brooklyn, where the owner talks to you like an old friend

There are great one-off restaurants that are independently charming and keep it that way by not trying to venture into the realm of franchising their success lest they lose that personal touch they offer their patrons. You may have to wait upwards of an hour to get into one of these quaint eateries, but the wait is usually worth it. When I’m in Brooklyn, my whole demeanor takes on a laid back attitude and I’ve learned to sit back and enjoy the people watching, the conversation of people around me, and the looks of a city and a neighborhood in the throws of becoming a destination spot.

Brooklyn certainly has its fill of high-profile restaurants that are also worth the effort. Peter Luger Steak House has been a mainstay in Brooklyn for decades (opened in 1887), with picture walls showcasing the well-known clientele that have dined at this historical establishment. Serving only aged short loin bone-in steaks, a minimally available premium cut of steak. Or check out The River Cafe’ that sits at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge and offers up a fine dining experience to match the views of the Manhattan skyline – day or night.

Enjoying the tender short loin bone-in steaks at Peter Luger Steak House, Brooklyn

Enjoying the tender short loin bone-in steaks at Peter Luger Steak House, Brooklyn

Brooklyn is a strong appeal to readers and writers. Or those who just need a quieter place to work, but want a little more social interaction than their apartments might afford them. With the advent of wi-fi accessibility at most places, there are several great little bistros and cafes that have set up their seating to accommodate several small, but open working quarters. Enjoying a locally brewed coffee or an organically and freshly made sandwich at Toby’s Estate allows you to settle in for hours at a time. Something that is often frowned upon in similarly appointed cafes in Manhattan – as there is usually a waiting line to get a place to sit.

The espresso lab, where employees of Toby's Estate create specialty brews for their patrons.

The espresso lab, where employees of Toby’s Estate create specialty brews for their patrons.

If museums are your thing, you’ve come to the right spot. Manhattan may boast world re-known museums, but Brooklyn can certainly hold its own when offering up cultural activities. The Brooklyn Museum is a beautifully housed museum that sits adjacent to the equally visited Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. It has amazing exhibits, entertaining openings, and often teams up with other Brooklynites to offer things such as spinning class in the museum. If you like something a little more on the thought-provoking side – check out the Morbid Anatomy Museum and Library. It takes a look at how the generations have viewed and dealt with death.

One of many bookcases at the Morbid Anatomy Museum and Library, offering insight into the subject of death

One of many bookcases at the Morbid Anatomy Museum and Library, offering insight into the subject of death

Rooftop bars may be the in thing in Manhattan, but rooftop patios abound in abundance on the tops of many of the apartment complexes in Brooklyn. Grab an $8 bottle of wine from Nini’s Wine Cellar on Havemeyer, stock up on several great cheeses, sausage, olives and chocolates at the Bedford Cheese Shop off Bedford Ave. (be sure to read the creative descriptions) and head to the rooftops to watch the sun set over Manhattan.

Two gals enjoying a glass of wine rooftop in Brooklyn

Two gals enjoying a glass of wine rooftop in Brooklyn

Everytime I visit Brooklyn, I realize more and more what this borough has to offer that can successfully grab my attention as equally as any amount of time spent in Manhattan. And I know there is still so much more to discover: Coney Island, Brighten Beach, Rockaway Point, Dumbo, Red Hook. Besides how many people have you heard with the name Manhattan compared to those named Brooklyn (both female and male) – i.e. Brooklyn Decker, Brooklyn Beckham.

For more pics on the sites of Brooklyn check out the Global Gallery.

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